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FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2017 Dec 15;364(23). doi: 10.1093/femsle/fnx228.

Antibiotic treatment disrupts bacterial communities in the colon and rectum of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmaceutics, Washington National Primate Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98121, USA.
2
Washington National Primate Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98121, USA.

Abstract

Antibiotic therapies are known to disrupt gastrointestinal (GI) bacterial communities. HIV and pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infections have also been associated with disrupted GI bacterial communities. We administered a combination antibiotic therapy to six SIV-infected rhesus macaques and collected colon biopsies, stool samples and rectal swabs before and after antibiotics, and evaluated the bacterial communities at each sample site using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The colon mucosa and stool samples displayed different bacterial communities, while the rectal swabs showed a mixture of the mucosal and stool-associated bacteria. Antibiotics disrupted the native bacterial communities at each sample site. The colon mucosa showed depleted abundances of the dominant Helicobacteraceae, while we found depleted abundances of the dominant Ruminococcaceae sp. in the stool. The rectal swabs showed similar trends as the colon mucosa, but were more variable. After the antibiotic treatment, there were increased abundances of similar taxa of facultative anaerobic bacteria, including Lactobacillaceae and Enterobacteriaceae at each sample site.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; SIV; antibiotics; macaque; microbiome; rectal swab

PMID:
29088370
PMCID:
PMC5827625
DOI:
10.1093/femsle/fnx228
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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