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J Biol Chem. 2018 Mar 30;293(13):4628-4635. doi: 10.1074/jbc.R117.000176. Epub 2017 Oct 30.

Copper signaling in the brain and beyond.

Author information

1
From the Departments of Chemistry and.
2
From the Departments of Chemistry and chrischang@berkeley.edu.
3
Molecular and Cell Biology and.
4
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-1460 and.
5
the Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720.

Abstract

Transition metals have been recognized and studied primarily in the context of their essential roles as structural and metabolic cofactors for biomolecules that compose living systems. More recently, an emerging paradigm of transition-metal signaling, where dynamic changes in transitional metal pools can modulate protein function, cell fate, and organism health and disease, has broadened our view of the potential contributions of these essential nutrients in biology. Using copper as a canonical example of transition-metal signaling, we highlight key experiments where direct measurement and/or visualization of dynamic copper pools, in combination with biochemical, physiological, and behavioral studies, have deciphered sources, targets, and physiological effects of copper signals.

KEYWORDS:

cancer biology; copper signaling; copper transport; immunology; lipolysis; metal homeostasis; neurobiology

PMID:
29084848
PMCID:
PMC5880129
[Available on 2019-03-30]
DOI:
10.1074/jbc.R117.000176
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