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J Cell Sci. 2017 Dec 15;130(24):4097-4107. doi: 10.1242/jcs.206862. Epub 2017 Oct 30.

Dynamic changes in the interchromosomal interaction of early histone gene loci during development of sea urchin.

Author information

1
Department of Mathematical and Life Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526, Japan.
2
JST, PRESTO, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530, Japan.
3
Research Center for the Mathematics on Chromatin Live Dynamics, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526, Japan.
4
Department of Mathematical and Life Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526, Japan naosaka@hiroshima-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

The nuclear positioning and chromatin dynamics of eukaryotic genes are closely related to the regulation of gene expression, but they have not been well examined during early development, which is accompanied by rapid cell cycle progression and dynamic changes in nuclear organization, such as nuclear size and chromatin constitution. In this study, we focused on the early development of the sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus and performed three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization of gene loci encoding early histones (one of the types of histone in sea urchin). There are two non-allelic early histone gene loci per sea urchin genome. We found that during the morula stage, when the early histone gene expression levels are at their maximum, interchromosomal interactions were often formed between the early histone gene loci on separate chromosomes and that the gene loci were directed to locate to more interior positions. Furthermore, these interactions were associated with the active transcription of the early histone genes. Thus, such dynamic interchromosomal interactions may contribute to the efficient synthesis of early histone mRNA during the morula stage of sea urchin development.

KEYWORDS:

Development; Early histone gene; Gene positioning; Interchromosomal interaction; Sea urchin

PMID:
29084822
DOI:
10.1242/jcs.206862
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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