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Schizophr Bull. 2018 Jan 13;44(1):46-53. doi: 10.1093/schbul/sbx105.

The Potential of Cannabidiol Treatment for Cannabis Users With Recent-Onset Psychosis.

Author information

1
Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

Abstract

A major factor associated with poor prognostic outcome after a first psychotic break is cannabis misuse, which is prevalent in schizophrenia and particularly common in individuals with recent-onset psychosis. Behavioral interventions aimed at reducing cannabis use have been unsuccessful in this population. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a phytocannabinoid found in cannabis, although at low concentrations in modern-day strains. CBD has a broad pharmacological profile, but contrary to ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), CBD does not activate CB1 or CB2 receptors and has at most subtle subjective effects. Growing evidence indicates that CBD acts as an antipsychotic and anxiolytic, and several reports suggest neuroprotective effects. Moreover, CBD attenuates THC's detrimental effects, both acutely and chronically, including psychotogenic, anxiogenic, and deleterious cognitive effects. This suggests that CBD may improve the disease trajectory of individuals with early psychosis and comorbid cannabis misuse in particular-a population with currently poor prognostic outcome and no specialized effective intervention.

KEYWORDS:

THC; cannabidiol; cannabis; first episode; psychosis

PMID:
29083450
PMCID:
PMC5768049
[Available on 2019-01-01]
DOI:
10.1093/schbul/sbx105

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