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AIDS Behav. 2018 Nov;22(11):3726-3733. doi: 10.1007/s10461-017-1940-1.

The Cost and Cost-utility of Three Public Health HIV Case-finding Strategies: Evidence from Rhode Island, 2012-2014.

Author information

1
Department of Health Services Research, Policy, and Practice, Brown University School of Public Health, South Main Street, Box G-S121-7, Providence, RI, 02903, USA.
2
Center for HIV/AIDS, STDs, Viral Hepatitis, and TB, Rhode Island Department of Health, 3 Capitol Hill, Providence, 02908, RI, USA.
3
Department of Health Services Research, Policy, and Practice, Brown University School of Public Health, South Main Street, Box G-S121-7, Providence, RI, 02903, USA. omar_galarraga@brown.edu.

Abstract

To evaluate three testing strategies to identify new HIV diagnoses in Rhode Island (RI). RI deployed three testing strategies, by using rapid HIV tests at clinical settings, community-based organization (CBO) settings, and the Partner Notification Services (PNS) program from 2012 to 2014. We reviewed the rapid HIV test results and confirmatory test results to identify new diagnoses, and conducted a cost-utility analysis. The average cost per new diagnosis was $33,015 at CBO settings, $5446 at clinical settings, and $33,818 at the PNS program. The cost-utility analysis showed the state-wide program was cost-saving; testing was cost-saving at clinical settings, and cost-effective at CBO settings and the PNS program. Further analyses showed that cost-effectiveness varied widely across CBOs. The HIV testing expansion program in RI was cost-saving overall. The heterogeneity of cost-effectiveness across settings should provide guidance to officials for allocation of future resources to HIV testing.

KEYWORDS:

Cost utility; Economic evaluation; HIV testing; Rapid HIV tests

PMID:
29079947
PMCID:
PMC5924423
[Available on 2019-11-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-017-1940-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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