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AIDS Behav. 2018 Jul;22(Suppl 1):76-84. doi: 10.1007/s10461-017-1946-8.

Symptoms of Depression in People Living with HIV in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam: Prevalence and Associated Factors.

Author information

1
Faculty of Public Health, Ho Chi Minh City University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 159 Hung Phu Street, Ward 8, District 8, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. ThaiThanhTruc@fphhcm.edu.vn.
2
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, 75 East Street Lidcombe, Sydney, NSW, 2141, Australia. ThaiThanhTruc@fphhcm.edu.vn.
3
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, 75 East Street Lidcombe, Sydney, NSW, 2141, Australia.
4
Discipline of Psychological Sciences, Australian College of Applied Psychology, Level 11, 255 Elizabeth Street, Sydney, NSW, 2000, Australia.
5
Global Health Sciences and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, 550 16th Street, Mission Hall, San Francisco, CA, 94105, USA.

Abstract

This cross-sectional study investigated the prevalence and correlates of symptoms of depression among 400 people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) from two HIV clinics in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Based on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale, 36.5% of participants were classified as likely to be clinically depressed. Factors independently associated with symptoms of depression included self-report of poor or fair health (aOR 2.16, 95% CI 1.33-3.51), having a low body mass index (aOR 1.85, 95% CI 1.13-3.04), reporting recent problems with family (aOR 1.97, 95% CI 1.21-3.19), feeling shame about being HIV-infected (aOR 1.90, 95% CI 1.20-3.00), and reporting conflict with a partner (aOR 2.21, 95% CI 1.14-4.26). Participants who lived with family (aOR 0.48, 95% CI 0.25-0.90) or who received emotional support from their families or supportive HIV networks (aOR 0.45, 95% CI 0.25-0.80) were less likely to experience symptoms of depression. Screening for and treatment of depression among Vietnamese PLHIV are needed.

KEYWORDS:

CES-D; Depression; HIV/AIDS; Outpatient; Vietnam

PMID:
29079945
PMCID:
PMC5924489
[Available on 2019-07-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-017-1946-8

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