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Br J Anaesth. 2017 Nov 1;119(5):928-933. doi: 10.1093/bja/aex270.

Effect of gum chewing on gastric volume and emptying: a prospective randomized crossover study.

Author information

1
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Femme Mère Enfant Hospital, 59, Boulevard Pinel, 69500 Bron, France.
2
Univ Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard, INSERM, LabTAU UMR1032, F-69003 Lyon, France.
3
University of Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69100 Villeurbanne, France.

Abstract

Background:

Current fasting guidelines allow oral intake of water up to 2 h before induction of anaesthesia. We assessed whether gum chewing affects gastric emptying of 250 ml water and residual gastric fluid volume measured 2 h after ingestion of water.

Methods:

This prospective randomized observer-blind crossover trial was performed on 20 healthy volunteers who attended two separate study sessions: Control and Chewing gum (chlorophyll flavour, with 2.1 g carbohydrate). Each session started with an ultrasound measurement of the antral area, followed by drinking 250 ml water. Then, volunteers either chewed a sugared gum for 45 min (Chewing gum) or did not (Control). Serial measurements of the antral area were performed during 120 min, and the half-time to gastric emptying (t½), total gastric emptying time, and gastric fluid volume before ingestion of water and 120 min later were calculated.

Results:

Gastric emptying of water was not different between sessions; the mean (sdsd) t½ was 23 (10) min in the Control session and 21 (7) min in the Chewing gum session (P=0.52). There was no significant difference between sessions in gastric fluid volumes measured before ingestion of water and 120 min later.

Conclusions:

Chewing gum does not affect gastric emptying of water and does not change gastric fluid volume measured 2 h after ingestion of water.

Clinical trial registration:

NCT02673307.

KEYWORDS:

chewing gum; gastric emptying; ultrasound imaging

PMID:
29077816
DOI:
10.1093/bja/aex270

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