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Am J Prev Med. 2018 Jan;54(1):124-128. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2017.08.016. Epub 2017 Oct 23.

Mobile Technology for Treatment Augmentation in Veteran Smokers With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

Author information

1
Mental Health Services, San Francisco Veterans Affairs Health Care System, San Francisco, California; Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California. Electronic address: ellen.herbst@va.gov.
2
Mental Health Services, San Francisco Veterans Affairs Health Care System, San Francisco, California; Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
3
National Center for PTSD, Dissemination and Training Division, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Menlo Park, California; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
5
Department of Clinical Psychology, Palo Alto University, Palo Alto, California.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility and acceptability of incorporating a mobile application, Stay Quit Coach, into an integrated care smoking-cessation treatment protocol for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

METHODS:

Participants included veteran smokers aged 18-69 years with PTSD. The integrated care protocol includes eight weekly PTSD-informed cognitive behavioral therapy sessions for smoking cessation, followed by monthly booster sessions and a prescription for standard smoking-cessation medications if desired. Participants used Stay Quit Coach as desired. Outcome measures at 3-month follow-up included: adherence (sessions attended), 30-day point-prevalence abstinence bioverified with carbon monoxide <6 parts per million, past-30 day mean daily cigarette use, exhaled carbon monoxide, nicotine dependence, and PTSD symptom severity. Repeated outcomes were analyzed with random-intercept linear mixed models. Data were collected in 2015-2016 and analyses were conducted in 2016-2017.

RESULTS:

Participants (n=20) were 95% male and 5% female; mean age 41.4 (SD=16.2) years. Thirteen participants (65%) attended all scheduled sessions, four (20%) did not adhere to the protocol on schedule, and three (15%) were lost to follow-up. At 3-month follow-up, six of 17 completers (35.3%) had bioverified 30-day point-prevalence abstinence. Nicotine dependence, carbon monoxide levels, and past 30-day cigarette use significantly decreased and PTSD symptoms were unchanged from baseline to follow-up. Participants self-reported using Stay Quit Coach 2.5 (SD=2.2) days/week; 15 of 17 (88.2%) reported using Stay Quit Coach <30 minutes/week; two of 17 (11.8%) reported using Stay Quit Coach 30-60 minutes/week.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although results must be interpreted with caution given the lack of control group and small sample size, findings indicate that integrating Stay Quit Coach into integrated care was feasible and acceptable.

PMID:
29074319
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2017.08.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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