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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2017 Oct 31;70(18):2290-2303. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2017.09.030.

Status of Early-Career Academic Cardiology: A Global Perspective.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Physiology, Texas A&M University College of Medicine and Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology-Temple Region, Baylor Scott & White Health, Temple, Texas. Electronic address: ctong@medicine.tamhsc.edu.
2
Department of Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Division of Cardiology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.
3
Market Intelligence, American College of Cardiology, Washington, District of Columbia.
4
Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York.
5
Division of Cardiology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California.
6
National Institute of Cardiology and Medical Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico.
7
Leviev Heart Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.
8
Weill Cornell Medical College/NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York.
9
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky.
10
Division of Cardiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
11
Cardiovascular Division, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.
12
Deutsches Herzzentrum München, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
13
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky.
14
Department of Cardiac Sciences, Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
15
Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
16
Research Operations, American Heart Association, Dallas, Texas.
17
Department of Cardiology, Boston Children's Hospital, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
18
Member Strategy, American College of Cardiology, Washington, District of Columbia.
19
Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Section, University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
20
Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiology Division, and Harry S. Moss Heart Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas.
21
Center for Cardiovascular Research, Department of Medicine and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.
22
Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado.

Abstract

Early-career academic cardiologists, who many believe are an important component of the future of cardiovascular care, face myriad challenges. The Early Career Section Academic Working Group of the American College of Cardiology, with senior leadership support, assessed the progress of this cohort from 2013 to 2016 with a global perspective. Data consisted of accessing National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute public information, data from the American Heart Association and international organizations, and a membership-wide survey. Although the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute increased funding of career development grants, only a small number of early-career American College of Cardiology members have benefited as funding of the entire cohort has decreased. Personal motivation, institutional support, and collaborators continued to be positive influential factors. Surprisingly, mentoring ceased to correlate positively with obtaining external grants. The totality of findings suggests that the status of early-career academic cardiologists remains challenging; therefore, the authors recommend a set of attainable solutions.

KEYWORDS:

cardiology profession; clinician-scientist; early-career academic cardiologist; mentoring; physician-scientist

PMID:
29073958
PMCID:
PMC5665176
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2017.09.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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