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Sleep Health. 2015 Mar;1(1):40-43. doi: 10.1016/j.sleh.2014.12.010. Epub 2015 Jan 8.

National Sleep Foundation's sleep time duration recommendations: methodology and results summary.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Division of Public Mental Health and Population Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.
2
National Sleep Foundation, Arlington, VA. Electronic address: kwhiton@sleepfoundation.org.
3
Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences, Pitt Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
4
Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA; David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.
5
Department of Developmental and Social Psychology, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy.
6
Department of Cell and Molecular Physiology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood IL.
7
The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX.
8
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX.
9
Division of Respiratory Diseases, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
10
Clinical Sleep Research, Section of Pediatric Sleep Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.
11
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
12
Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC.
13
Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center, Division of Public Mental Health and Population Sciences, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA.
14
Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
15
Department of Biology, Gannon University, Erie, PA.
16
American Academy of Pediatrics, Elk Grove Village, IL.
17
Inpatient Geriatrics, Robley Rex VAMC, Department of Internal Medicine and Family & Geriatric Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY.
18
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
19
Division of Sleep Medicine, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA.
20
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective was to conduct a scientifically rigorous update to the National Sleep Foundation's sleep duration recommendations.

METHODS:

The National Sleep Foundation convened an 18-member multidisciplinary expert panel, representing 12 stakeholder organizations, to evaluate scientific literature concerning sleep duration recommendations. We determined expert recommendations for sufficient sleep durations across the lifespan using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method.

RESULTS:

The panel agreed that, for healthy individuals with normal sleep, the appropriate sleep duration for newborns is between 14 and 17 hours, infants between 12 and 15 hours, toddlers between 11 and 14 hours, preschoolers between 10 and 13 hours, and school-aged children between 9 and 11 hours. For teenagers, 8 to 10 hours was considered appropriate, 7 to 9 hours for young adults and adults, and 7 to 8 hours of sleep for older adults.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sufficient sleep duration requirements vary across the lifespan and from person to person. The recommendations reported here represent guidelines for healthy individuals and those not suffering from a sleep disorder. Sleep durations outside the recommended range may be appropriate, but deviating far from the normal range is rare. Individuals who habitually sleep outside the normal range may be exhibiting signs or symptoms of serious health problems or, if done volitionally, may be compromising their health and well-being.

KEYWORDS:

Lifespan sleep; National Sleep Foundation; RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method; Sleep adequacy; Sleep by age; Sleep duration; Sleep sufficiency; Sleep time recommendations

PMID:
29073412
DOI:
10.1016/j.sleh.2014.12.010

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