Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sleep Health. 2015 Mar;1(1):36-39. doi: 10.1016/j.sleh.2014.12.003. Epub 2014 Dec 9.

Adolescent sleep disparities: sex and racial/ethnic differences.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle No. 311280, Denton, TX 76203-5017, USA.
2
Department of Psychology, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle No. 311280, Denton, TX 76203-5017, USA. Electronic address: Daniel.Taylor@unt.edu.
3
Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 224 Garland Hall, 2441 E Hartford Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53211, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

During adolescence, significant changes occur in sleep (eg, decreased sleep duration and increased sleep problems). To date, few studies have examined whether self-reported sleep duration differences exist between races/ethnicities in early adolescence (ages 11-14 years).

METHODS:

This study compared sexes and race/ethnicity groups on self-reported sleep duration in a large (n = 1543; 48.9% boys) racially/ethnically diverse (62.7% White, 23.7% Hispanic/Latino, 10.4% African American, and 3.2% Asian) sample of young adolescents (mean age, 12.31) drawn from local middle schools.

RESULTS:

A 2-way analysis of variance revealed that there was a trend for a significant sex effect (P = .067, partial χ2 = .002), with boys reporting more sleep than girls and significant race/ethnicity effects (P < .001, partial χ2 = .012), with Hispanic and African American students reporting shorter sleep duration than White and Asian students. The interaction between sex × race/ethnicity was significant (P = .014, partial χ2 = .002), with post hoc tests revealing that Hispanic males demonstrated significantly shorter sleep duration than White and Asian males and African American females demonstrating significantly shorter sleep duration than White females.

CONCLUSIONS:

Given the literature showing short sleep duration is related to various negative health outcomes and all-cause mortality, more research is needed to determine the factors involved in these disparities. Adolescent sleep disparities: sex and racial/ethnic differences.

PMID:
29073411
DOI:
10.1016/j.sleh.2014.12.003

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center