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Cancer Res. 2018 Jan 1;78(1):302-308. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-17-1923. Epub 2017 Oct 25.

Results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Link Vitamin B6 Catabolism and Lung Cancer Risk.

Author information

1
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. hui.zuo@uib.no.
2
Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
3
Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
4
Bevital A/S, Bergen, Norway.
5
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
6
The Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Bergen, Norway.
7
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
8
Université Paris-Saclay, Université Paris-Sud, UVSQ, Inserm, CESP, Generations and health, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.
9
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany.
10
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
11
Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece.
12
First Department of Critical Care Medicine and Pulmonary Services, University of Athens Medical School, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens, Greece.
13
Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
14
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
15
Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy.
16
Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori Via Venezian, Milano, Italy.
17
Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica Echirurgia Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
18
Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands.
19
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
20
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
21
Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
22
MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom.
23
Department of Medical Biosciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
24
Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
25
Unic of Nutrition and Cancer, Cataln Institute of Oncology, IDIBELL, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain.
26
Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain.
27
CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
28
Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, Regional Government of the Basque Country, Spain.
29
Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública. Instituto de Investigación, Biosanitaria ibs. GRANADA. Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain.
30
Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
31
Department of Health and Social Sciences, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia, Spain.
32
Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain.
33
IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain.
34
Institute of Population Health Sciences, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli, Taiwan.
35
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
36
Centre for Primary Care and Public Health, Queen Mary, University of London, London, United Kingdom.
37
Epidemiology and Medical Statistic Unit, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
38
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.

Abstract

Circulating pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) has been linked to lung cancer risk. The PAr index, defined as the ratio 4-pyridoxic acid/(pyridoxal + PLP), reflects increased vitamin B6 catabolism during inflammation. PAr has been defined as a marker of lung cancer risk in a prospective cohort study, but analysis of a larger numbers of cases are needed to deepen the significance of this study. Here, we conducted a nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, n = 521,330), which included 892 incident lung cancer cases and 1,748 controls matched by center, gender, date of blood collection, and date of birth. The association of PAr with risk of lung cancer was evaluated by using conditional logistic regression. Study participants with elevated PAr experienced higher risk of lung cancer in a dose-response fashion, with a doubling in PAr levels associated with 52% higher odds of lung cancer after adjustment for tobacco smoking, serum cotinine levels, educational attainment, and BMI [OR, 1.52; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.27-1.81; P < 0.001]. Additional adjustment for intake of vegetables and fruits and physical activity did not materially affect risk association. The association of PAr with lung cancer risk was similar in both genders but slightly stronger in former smokers and in participants diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma. This study provides robust evidence that increased vitamin B6 catabolism is independently associated with a higher risk of future lung cancer.Significance: This large cohort study firmly establishes an association between an index of vitamin B6 levels with lung cancer risk. Cancer Res; 78(1); 302-8. ©2017 AACR.

PMID:
29070616
DOI:
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-17-1923
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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