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Compr Psychiatry. 2018 Jan;80:89-96. doi: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2017.09.004. Epub 2017 Sep 13.

Patterns of cannabis use and clinical correlates among individuals with Major Depressive Disorder and Bipolar Disorder.

Author information

1
Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
2
Psychology Department, Ariel University, Ariel, Israel; Lev-Hasharon Medical Center, Pardesiya, Israel.
3
Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Technische Universität Dresden, Klinische Psychologie & Psychotherapie, Dresden, Germany.
4
Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Lev-Hasharon Medical Center, Pardesiya, Israel; Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: shauli.levran@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Bipolar Disorder (BPD) are the most severe mood disorders globally. Previous reports indicate high co-occurrence of cannabis use and cannabis use disorders (CUDs) associated with both disorders, yet studies comparing patterns of cannabis use between individuals with MDD and BPD are scarce.

METHODS:

Data were drawn from Wave 1 (2001-2002) of the National Epidemiologic survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Cannabis users who qualified for a diagnosis of past-year MDD (N=217) were compared to those with BPD (N=168) in frequency and daily dose of cannabis use, rates of comorbid psychiatric disorders including specific criteria of CUDs, treatment utilization and suicidality.

RESULTS:

Among past-year cannabis users, individuals with BPD reported using cannabis more frequently and smoking more joints per day compared to those with MDD. They were also more likely to suffer from comorbid personality disorders and qualify for specific CUD-criteria, including use in physically hazardous situations and unsuccessful efforts to control substance use.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results indicate that individuals with BPD may present more intensive patterns of cannabis use compared to those with MDD. This may have potential effects on the course of BPD and should be further explored in longitudinal studies.

PMID:
29069624
DOI:
10.1016/j.comppsych.2017.09.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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