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Alzheimers Dement (N Y). 2017 Feb 9;3(1):107-113. doi: 10.1016/j.trci.2016.12.005. eCollection 2017 Jan.

The prevalence and biomarkers' characteristic of rapidly progressive Alzheimer's disease from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Yantai Yuhuangding Hospital Affiliated to Qingdao Medical University, Shandong, People's Republic of China.
2
Alzheimer's Disease Research Unit, McGill Centre for Studies in Aging, McGill University, Douglas Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
3
Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China.
4
Department of Neurology, National Neuroscience Institute, Singapore.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The prevalence and detailed biomarkers' characteristic of rapidly progressive Alzheimer's disease (rpAD) remain incompletely understood.

METHODS:

A total of 312 mild AD patients from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database were chosen and dichotomized into rpAD and non-rpAD groups. We performed the prevalence and comprehensive biomarker evaluation.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of rpAD was 17.6% in mild AD. Compared with non-rpAD, there were no differences in APOE ε4/ε4, APOE ε3/ε4, and APOE ε2/ε4 genotype distribution, cerebrospinal fluid tau, phosphorylated tau (p-tau), amyloid-β, hippocampus volume, and amyloid deposition in rpAD. Yet, a lower p-tau/tau ratio was observed in rpAD (P = .04). rpAD showed region-specific hypometabolism ([18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography [FDG-PET]) (P = .001). Receiver-operating characteristic analysis of FDG-PET demonstrated that left angular and left temporal cortices were the regions with higher area under the curve and predictive value for identifying clinical at-risk rpAD.

DISCUSSION:

We identified that rpAD commonly existed in mild AD. Cerebral hypometabolism could provide potential clinical differential value for rpAD in the short-term follow-up period.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; Biomarkers; Rapidly progressive dementia

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