Format

Send to

Choose Destination
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth. 2017 Oct 24;5(10):e161. doi: 10.2196/mhealth.8352.

Mobile Technology Use Across Age Groups in Patients Eligible for Cardiac Rehabilitation: Survey Study.

Author information

1
Charles Perkins Centre, Sydney Nursing School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, Australia.
2
Ryde Hospital, Northern Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, Australia.
3
Manly Hospital, Northern Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, Australia.
4
Royal North Shore Hospital, Northern Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, Australia.
5
Hornsby Ku-ring-gai Hospital, Northern Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, Australia.
6
St George Hospital, South Eastern Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, Australia.
7
Charles Perkins Centre, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
8
Charles Perkins Centre, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
9
School of Health and Social Care, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Emerging evidence indicates mobile technology-based strategies may improve access to secondary prevention and reduce risk factors in cardiac patients. However, little is known about cardiac patients' use of mobile technology, particularly for health reasons and whether the usage varies across patient demographics.

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to describe cardiac patients' use of mobile technology and to determine variations between age groups after adjusting for education, employment, and confidence with using mobile technology.

METHODS:

Cardiac patients eligible for attending cardiac rehabilitation were recruited from 9 hospital and community sites across metropolitan and rural settings in New South Wales, Australia. Participants completed a survey on the use of mobile technology devices, features used, confidence with using mobile technology, willingness and interest in learning, and health-related use.

RESULTS:

The sample (N=282) had a mean age of 66.5 (standard deviation [SD] 10.6) years, 71.9% (203/282) were male, and 79.0% (223/282) lived in a metropolitan area. The most common diagnoses were percutaneous coronary intervention (33.3%, 94/282) and myocardial infarction (22.7%, 64/282). The majority (91.1%, 257/282) used at least one type of technology device, 70.9% (200/282) used mobile technology (mobile phone/tablet), and 31.9% (90/282) used all types. Technology was used by 54.6% (154/282) for health purposes, most often to access information on health conditions (41.4%, 117/282) and medications (34.8%, 98/282). Age had an important independent association with the use of mobile technology after adjusting for education, employment, and confidence. The youngest group (<56 years) was over 4 times more likely to use any mobile technology than the oldest (>69 years) age group (odds ratio [OR] 4.45, 95% CI 1.46-13.55), 5 times more likely to use mobile apps (OR 5.00, 95% CI 2.01-12.44), and 3 times more likely to use technology for health-related reasons (OR 3.31, 95% CI 1.34-8.18). Compared with the older group, the middle age group (56-69 years) was more than twice as likely to use any mobile technology (OR 2.42, 95% CI 1.27-4.59) and mobile technology for health-related purposes (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.04-3.53). Participants who had completed high school were twice as likely to use mobile technology (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.45-4.70), mobile apps (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.09-3.84), and mobile technology for health-related reasons (OR 5.09, 95% CI 2.89-8.95) than those who had not completed high school. Associations were also present between participants living in metropolitan areas and mobile technology use (OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.07-4.24) and employment and mobile app use (OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.44-5.140).

CONCLUSIONS:

Mobile technology offers an important opportunity to improve access to secondary prevention for cardiac patients, particularly when modified to suit subgroups. High levels of mobile technology use and health motivation need to be harnessed for secondary prevention.

KEYWORDS:

cardiac rehabilitation; cardiovascular disease; cell phone; digital divide; mobile phone

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for JMIR Publications Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center