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Neuroimage Clin. 2017 Oct 12;17:115-123. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2017.10.013. eCollection 2018.

Changes in subcortical resting-state functional connectivity in patients with psychophysiological insomnia after cognitive-behavioral therapy: Changes in resting-state FC after CBT for insomnia patients.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Eunpyeong Seoul Metropolitan Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Center for Sleep and Chronobiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Gachon University, Neuroresearch Institute, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Psychology, University at Buffalo, New York, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To examine the resting-state functional connectivity (FC) between subcortical regions in relation to whole-brain activity in patients with psychophysiological insomnia (PI) and changes following cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTi).

METHODS:

The FC between subcortical seed regions (caudate, putamen, pallidum, amygdala, thalamus, and hippocampus) and whole-brain voxels were compared between the PI group (n = 13, mean age: 51.0 ± 10.2 years) and good sleepers (GS, n = 18, mean age: 42.7 ± 12.3 years). Also, in the PI group, FC was compared before and after 5 weeks of CBTi.

RESULTS:

Compared to the GS group, the PI group exhibited stronger FC between the thalamus and prefrontal cortex and between the pallidum and precuneus but weaker FC between the pallidum and angular gyrus, the caudate and orbitofrontal cortex, and the hippocampus and fusiform gyrus. After CBTi, the PI group exhibited decreased FC between the thalamus and parietal cortex, the putamen and motor cortices, and the amygdala and lingual gyrus, but increased FC between the caudate and supramarginal gyrus, the pallidum and orbitofrontal cortex, and the hippocampus and frontal/parietal gyri.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present findings demonstrate different FC in PI patients compared to GS and provide insight into the neurobiological rationale for CBTi.

KEYWORDS:

Cognitive–behavioral therapy; Functional connectivity; Functional magnetic resonance imaging; Insomnia; Psychophysiological insomnia; Resting state

PMID:
29062688
PMCID:
PMC5647526
DOI:
10.1016/j.nicl.2017.10.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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