Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Rheum Dis Clin North Am. 2017 Nov;43(4):593-606. doi: 10.1016/j.rdc.2017.06.008. Epub 2017 Aug 23.

Neurosarcoidosis.

Author information

1
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, 200 First Avenue Southwest, Rochester, MN 55905, USA; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, 2 Prannok Road, Bangkok 10700, Thailand. Electronic address: P.Ungprasert@gmail.com.
2
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, 200 First Avenue Southwest, Rochester, MN 55905, USA; Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Science Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, 200 First Avenue Southwest, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Abstract

Neurosarcoidosis occurs in 3% to 10% of patients with sarcoidosis. Cranial neuropathy and meningeal involvement are the most common manifestations, but any part of the nervous system can be affected. Definite diagnosis requires the presence of noncaseating granuloma in the nervous system, although histopathologic confirmation is often not obtainable. Moderate to high dose of glucocorticoids is the main therapy for neurosarcoidosis. Relapse often occurs after the dose of glucocorticoids is tapered down, often necessitating the use of steroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical manifestation; Imaging study; Neurosarcoidosis; Outcome; Sarcoidosis; Treatment

PMID:
29061245
DOI:
10.1016/j.rdc.2017.06.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center