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PLoS One. 2017 Oct 23;12(10):e0186960. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0186960. eCollection 2017.

Creation of a pediatric mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma cohort within the Pediatric Health Information System Database.

Citrin R1,2, Horowitz JP3, Reilly AF1,4, Li Y1,2,4, Huang YS5, Getz KD1,5, Seif AE1,4, Fisher BT2,4,5,6, Aplenc R1,2,4,5.

Author information

1
Division of Oncology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
2
Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
3
Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
5
Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
6
Division of Infectious Diseases, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America.

Abstract

Mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) constitutes a collection of relatively rare pediatric malignancies. In order to utilize administrative data to perform large-scale epidemiologic studies within this population, a two-step process was used to assemble a 12-year cohort of B-NHL patients treated between 2004 and 2015 within the Pediatric Health Information System database. Patients were identified by ICD-9 codes, and their chemotherapy data were then manually reviewed against standard B-NHL treatment regimens. A total of 1,409 patients were eligible for cohort inclusion. This process was validated at a single center, utilizing both an institutional tumor registry and medical record review as the gold standards. The validation demonstrated appropriate sensitivity (91.5%) and positive predictive value (95.1%) to allow for the future use of this cohort for epidemiologic and comparative effectiveness research.

PMID:
29059235
PMCID:
PMC5653357
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0186960
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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