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Nutrients. 2017 Oct 18;9(10). pii: E1129. doi: 10.3390/nu9101129.

Indications and Use of the Gluten Contamination Elimination Diet for Patients with Non-Responsive Celiac Disease.

Author information

1
Center for Celiac Research, Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, MA 02114, USA. mleonard7@mgh.harvard.edu.
2
Center for Celiac Research, Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, MA 02114, USA. pcureton@mgh.harvard.edu.
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. pcureton@mgh.harvard.edu.
4
Center for Celiac Research, Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, MA 02114, USA. afasano@mgh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

For the majority of patients diagnosed with celiac disease, once a gluten-free diet is initiated, symptoms improve within weeks and may completely resolve in months. However, up to 30% of patients may show signs, symptoms or persistent small intestinal damage after one year on a gluten-free diet. These patients require evaluation for other common GI etiologies and assessment of their celiac disease status in order to make a diagnosis and suggest treatment. Here, we propose an approach to evaluating patients with celiac disease with persistent symptoms, persistently elevated serology, and or persistent villous atrophy despite a gluten-free diet. We detail how to diagnose and distinguish between non-responsive and refractory celiac disease. Finally, we introduce the indications for use of the gluten contamination elimination diet and provide information for practitioners to implement the diet when necessary in their practice.

KEYWORDS:

celiac; celiac disease; gluten; gluten contamination elimination; gluten-free diet; non-responsive; refractory

PMID:
29057833
PMCID:
PMC5691745
DOI:
10.3390/nu9101129
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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