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J Biomed Mater Res A. 2018 Mar;106(3):822-828. doi: 10.1002/jbm.a.36277. Epub 2017 Nov 29.

Novel self-gelling injectable hydrogel/alpha-tricalcium phosphate composites for bone regeneration: Physiochemical and microcomputer tomographical characterization.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
2
Engineering Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom.
3
Materials Science Institute (MSI), Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom.
4
Department of Ceramics and Refractories, AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland.
5
Department of Experimental Physics, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
6
FSRC "Crystallography and Photonics", Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, RAS, Moscow, Russia.
7
Institute of Nanostructures and Biosystems, Saratov State University, Saratov, Russia.
8
Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany.
9
Laboratory for Applications of Synchrotron Radiation, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany.
10
Centre for Organismal Studies, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
11
Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
12
Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
13
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
14
Centre for Nano- and Biophotonics, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.

Abstract

Mineralized hydrogels are increasingly gaining attention as biomaterials for bone regeneration. The most common mineralization strategy has been addition of preformed inorganic particles during hydrogel formation. This maintains injectability. One common form of bone cement is formed by mixing particles of the highly reactive calcium phosphate alpha-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) with water to form hydroxyapatite (HA). The calcium ions released during this reaction can be exploited to crosslink anionic, calcium-binding polymers such as the polysaccharide gellan gum (GG) to induce hydrogel formation. In this study, three different amounts of α-TCP particles were added to GG polymer solution to generate novel, injectable hydrogel-inorganic composites. Distribution of the inorganic phase in the hydrogel was studied by high resolution microcomputer tomography (µCT). Gelation occurred within 30 min. α-TCP converted to HA. µCT revealed inhomogeneous distribution of the inorganic phase in the composites. These results demonstrate the potential of the composites as alternatives to traditional α-TCP bone cement and pave the way for incorporation of biologically active substances and in vitro and in vivo testing.

KEYWORDS:

bone cement; composite; gellan gum; hydrogel; micro-CT

PMID:
29057619
DOI:
10.1002/jbm.a.36277

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