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Ann Hepatol. 2017 November-December,;16(6):901-908. doi: 10.5604/01.3001.0010.5281.

The Great Chinese Famine Exposure in Early Life and the Risk of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Adult Women.

Author information

1
Department of Endocrinology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.
2
The Public Health Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION AND AIM:

Previous studies found famine exposure was associated with a higher risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS). In the study, we investigated the relationship between Chinese famine exposure and the risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in adult women.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Data were obtained from subjects via routine physical examinations in the Public Health Center of our hospital between 2011 and 2014. Women were categorized into the following three groups: control, prenatally exposed, and postnatally exposed. Hepatic steatosis was diagnosed according to the guidelines established for the diagnosis and treatment of NAFLD.

RESULTS:

The prevalence rates of NAFLD among non-exposed, prenatally, and postnatally exposed women were 17.3, 23.0, and 22.9%, respectively. Pre-exposed and postnatally exposed women had higher risks of NAFLD, exhibiting ORs (95% CI) of 1.33 (1.04-1.70) and 1.26 (1.03-1.55), respectively. Prenatally, but not postnatally, exposed women had significantly higher risks of having abnormal alanine aminotransferase (ALT), with ORs of 1.30 (1.05-1.61).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results indicate a significant association between famine exposure in early life and the risk of NAFLD in adult women. Prenatally exposed women displayed higher risks of NAFLD and mild, moderate and severe steatosis.

KEYWORDS:

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Chinese. Metabolic syndrome. Maternal/Fetal. Malnutrition.

PMID:
29055916
DOI:
10.5604/01.3001.0010.5281
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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