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J Adolesc Health. 2018 Jan;62(1):118-120. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.08.013. Epub 2017 Oct 17.

Computer-Facilitated Screening and Brief Advice to Reduce Adolescents' Heavy Episodic Drinking: A Study in Two Countries.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of Developmental Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of Adolescent/Young Adult Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; The Center for Adolescent Substance Abuse Research (CeASAR), Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: john.knight@childrens.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Counseling and Psychology, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, South Hamilton, Massachusetts.
3
Centre for Evaluation, Prevention and Research of Substance Abuse, Prague, Czech Republic; National Institute of Mental Health, Klecany, Czech Republic.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of Developmental Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; The Center for Adolescent Substance Abuse Research (CeASAR), Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
5
University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine, Biddeford, Maine.
6
Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of Developmental Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of Adolescent/Young Adult Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; The Center for Adolescent Substance Abuse Research (CeASAR), Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

A computer-facilitated screening and brief advice (cSBA) intervention was previously shown to reduce drinking among U.S. adolescents but not among Czech youth. The purpose of this study was to assess cSBA effect on heavy episodic drinking (HED).

METHODS:

Participants were 12- to 18-year-olds at nine U.S. primary care offices (N = 2,096) and 10 Czech pediatrician-generalist offices (N = 589) who completed measurements only during an 18-month treatment-as-usual (TAU) phase. We then initiated the cSBA protocol for all participants and recruited the 18-month cSBA phase. Generalized Estimating Equations logistic regression compared past-90-day HED for cSBA versus TAU at 3- and 12-months, controlling for baseline HED and other covariates.

RESULTS:

Baseline past-90-day HED rates were 11% for U.S. and 28% for Czech youth. At 3 months, among Czech baseline non-HED, the adjusted relative risk ratio for cSBA versus TAU was .52 (95% confidence interval .29, .92). The effect dissipated by 12 months.

CONCLUSIONS:

cSBA shows promise for short-term prevention of adolescent HED.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00592956 NCT00592878.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Heavy episodic drinking; Technology-assisted prevention

PMID:
29054734
PMCID:
PMC5742033
DOI:
10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.08.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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