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Acta Psychol (Amst). 2017 Nov;181:62-74. doi: 10.1016/j.actpsy.2017.10.004. Epub 2017 Oct 25.

Metacognitive deficits in categorization tasks in a population with impaired inner speech.

Author information

1
Department of Philosophy, Center for Cognition, Action & Perception, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA. Electronic address: Langland-Hassan@uc.edu.
2
Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Cultural and Social Sciences, University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria.
3
Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
4
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
5
Department of Philosophy, Center for Cognition, Action & Perception, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

Abstract

This study examines the relation of language use to a person's ability to perform categorization tasks and to assess their own abilities in those categorization tasks. A silent rhyming task was used to confirm that a group of people with post-stroke aphasia (PWA) had corresponding covert language production (or "inner speech") impairments. The performance of the PWA was then compared to that of age- and education-matched healthy controls on three kinds of categorization tasks and on metacognitive self-assessments of their performance on those tasks. The PWA showed no deficits in their ability to categorize objects for any of the three trial types (visual, thematic, and categorial). However, on the categorial trials, their metacognitive assessments of whether they had categorized correctly were less reliable than those of the control group. The categorial trials were distinguished from the others by the fact that the categorization could not be based on some immediately perceptible feature or on the objects' being found together in a type of scenario or setting. This result offers preliminary evidence for a link between covert language use and a specific form of metacognition.

KEYWORDS:

Aphasia; Categorization; Concepts; Inner speech; Language; Metacognition

PMID:
29054044
DOI:
10.1016/j.actpsy.2017.10.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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