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Diabetes Obes Metab. 2018 Mar;20(3):646-653. doi: 10.1111/dom.13134. Epub 2017 Nov 19.

Effects of common cold and concomitant administration of nasal decongestant on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of nasal glucagon in otherwise healthy participants: A randomized clinical trial.

Author information

1
Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana.
2
Locemia Solutions, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
3
Algorithme Pharma Inc., Montréal, Québec, Canada.
4
JSS Medical Research, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
5
Eli Lilly Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

AIMS:

Nasal glucagon (NG) is a nasally-administered glucagon powder, absorbed through the nasal mucosa, designed for treatment of severe hypoglycaemia. This study evaluated the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of NG in otherwise healthy participants with common colds and after recovery from cold symptoms, with and without concomitant nasal decongestant.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

This was a single-centre, open-label study. Cohort 1 participants (N = 18) received 2 doses of NG: one while experiencing nasal congestion and another after recovery from cold symptoms. Cohort 2 participants (N = 18), who also had colds with nasal congestion, received a single dose of NG 2 hours after treatment with the decongestant oxymetazoline. Total symptoms score and other safety measures were assessed before and after NG administration.

RESULTS:

NG was well tolerated, without serious adverse events. Common adverse events (transient lacrimation, nasal discomfort, rhinorrhea and nausea) were more frequent in both Cohorts 1 and 2 during nasal congestion. Glucagon levels peaked 18 minutes post-dose and glucose levels peaked 30 to 42 minutes post-dose in all groups. Nasal congestion, with or without concomitant nasal decongestant, did not significantly affect PK of NG. Although glucose AUECs0-t was different between Cohort 1 with nasal congestion and Cohort 2, glucose concentrations at 30 minutes appeared similar in all groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

There were no clinically relevant differences in safety or PK/PD of NG associated with nasal congestion or concomitant administration of nasal decongestant, suggesting that NG can be used to treat severe hypoglycaemia in individuals experiencing nasal congestion.

KEYWORDS:

glucagon; hypoglycaemia

PMID:
29053231
PMCID:
PMC5836949
DOI:
10.1111/dom.13134
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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