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Child Neurol Open. 2017 Oct 12;4:2329048X17732713. doi: 10.1177/2329048X17732713. eCollection 2017 Jan-Dec.

Performance Monitoring in Children Following Traumatic Brain Injury Compared to Typically Developing Children.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2
Program in Neuroscience & Mental Health, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
Dr Maureen Dennis passed away during the completion of this study.
4
Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
5
Department of Critical Care Medicine, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
6
Division of Emergency Medicine, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
7
Division of Pediatric Intensive Care, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Hamilton, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
8
Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Neurological Sciences and Epidemiology, Schulich School of Medicine, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.
9
Department of Psychiatry, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

Children with traumatic brain injury are reported to have deficits in performance monitoring, but the mechanisms underlying these deficits are not well understood. Four performance monitoring hypotheses were explored by comparing how 28 children with traumatic brain injury and 28 typically developing controls (matched by age and sex) performed on the stop-signal task. Control children slowed significantly more following incorrect than correct stop-signal trials, fitting the error monitoring hypothesis. In contrast, the traumatic brain injury group showed no performance monitoring difference with trial types, but significant group differences did not emerge, suggesting that children with traumatic brain injury may not perform the same way as controls.

KEYWORDS:

pediatrics; performance monitoring; stop-signal task; traumatic brain injury

Conflict of interest statement

Declaration of Conflicting Interests: The authors declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

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