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J Tissue Viability. 2017 Nov;26(4):246-253. doi: 10.1016/j.jtv.2017.09.008. Epub 2017 Oct 4.

Medical device-related pressure injuries: An exploratory descriptive study in an acute tertiary hospital in Australia.

Author information

1
Sydney Nursing School, The University of Sydney and Sydney Local Health District, Patient Safety and Quality, Level 7, KGV, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missenden Road, Camperdown, Australia. Electronic address: Michelle.Barakat-Johnson@health.nsw.gov.au.
2
Sydney Nursing School, The University of Sydney and Sydney Local Health District, The Cancer Nursing Research Unit, Lifehouse, Missenden Road, Camperdown, Australia. Electronic address: cathy.barnett@sydney.edu.au.
3
Sydney Nursing School, The University of Sydney and Sydney Local Health District, Emergency Department, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missenden Road, Camperdown, Australia. Electronic address: tim.wand@health.nsw.gov.au.
4
Sydney Nursing School, The University of Sydney and Sydney Local Health District, The Cancer Nursing Research Unit, Lifehouse, Missenden Road, Camperdown, Australia. Electronic address: kate.white@sydney.edu.au.

Abstract

AIM:

To examine and explore medical device-related pressure injuries in an 800-bed tertiary hospital.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

An exploratory descriptive study design was employed. A prospective review of all data on reported hospital-acquired pressure injuries was conducted on a weekly basis from July 2015 to August 2016. This included a patient assessment and medical record review as well as brief semi-structured interviews with nurses.

RESULTS:

The overall incidence of medical device-related pressure injuries was 27.9% (50/179) with the majority (68%, 34/50) occurring in intensive care. The most common cause of a medical device-related pressure injury was oxygen tubing behind ears (n = 21) and endotracheal tubes (n = 13). Nurses were unaware of the implications of medical devices in contact with the skin and patient medical records did not present a valuable source of information in relation to pressure injury prevention.

CONCLUSION:

Medical device-related pressure injuries were represented in 27.9% of our entire patient cohort; primarily occurring on the ear from oxygen tubing and on the mouth from endotracheal tubes in patients in intensive care. Additional support, education and monitoring for nurses at a local level on the prevention of medical device-related pressure injuries is necessary to prevent their occurrence. Furthermore, consensus on the classification and reporting of medical device-related pressure injuries is still in development, making reporting and monitoring challenging. Medical device-related pressure injuries are a continuing clinical issue that require further exploration.

KEYWORDS:

Device-related; Exploratory descriptive study; Hospital-acquired; Medical device; Pressure injury; Pressure ulcer

PMID:
29050901
DOI:
10.1016/j.jtv.2017.09.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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