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Am J Public Health. 2017 Dec;107(12):1923-1929. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2017.304057. Epub 2017 Oct 19.

Easiness of Legal Access to Concealed Firearm Permits and Homicide Rates in the United States.

Author information

1
Michael Siegel, Ziming Xuan, Craig S. Ross, and Sandro Galea are with the Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Bindu Kalesan is with the Boston University School of Medicine. Eric Fleegler is with Children's Hospital Boston. Kristin A. Goss is with the Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the relation of "shall-issue" laws, in which permits must be issued if requisite criteria are met; "may-issue" laws, which give law enforcement officials wide discretion over whether to issue concealed firearm carry permits or not; and homicide rates.

METHODS:

We compared homicide rates in shall-issue and may-issue states and total, firearm, nonfirearm, handgun, and long-gun homicide rates in all 50 states during the 25-year period of 1991 to 2015. We included year and state fixed effects and numerous state-level factors in the analysis.

RESULTS:

Shall-issue laws were significantly associated with 6.5% higher total homicide rates, 8.6% higher firearm homicide rates, and 10.6% higher handgun homicide rates, but were not significantly associated with long-gun or nonfirearm homicide.

CONCLUSIONS:

Shall-issue laws are associated with significantly higher rates of total, firearm-related, and handgun-related homicide.

PMID:
29048964
PMCID:
PMC5678379
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2017.304057
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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