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Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci. 2017 Dec 1;12(12):1928-1939. doi: 10.1093/scan/nsx123.

Salience network dynamics underlying successful resistance of temptation.

Author information

1
Division of Mind and Brain Research, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy CCM, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt - Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany.
2
Department of Psychology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
3
Berlin School of Mind and Brain.
4
Department of Psychology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
5
Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, USA.
6
The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM 87106.
7
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA.
8
International Psychoanalytic University Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
9
Department of Psychology, FernUniversität, Hagen, Hagen, Germany.
10
Neuroscience Program, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA.

Abstract

Self-control and the ability to resist temptation are critical for successful completion of long-term goals. Contemporary models in cognitive neuroscience emphasize the primary role of prefrontal cognitive control networks in aligning behavior with such goals. Here, we use gaze pattern analysis and dynamic functional connectivity fMRI data to explore how individual differences in the ability to resist temptation are related to intrinsic brain dynamics of the cognitive control and salience networks. Behaviorally, individuals exhibit greater gaze distance from target location (e.g. higher distractibility) during presentation of tempting erotic images compared with neutral images. Individuals whose intrinsic dynamic functional connectivity patterns gravitate toward configurations in which salience detection systems are less strongly coupled with visual systems resist tempting distractors more effectively. The ability to resist tempting distractors was not significantly related to intrinsic dynamics of the cognitive control network. These results suggest that susceptibility to temptation is governed in part by individual differences in salience network dynamics and provide novel evidence for involvement of brain systems outside canonical cognitive control networks in contributing to individual differences in self-control.

KEYWORDS:

dynamic functional connectivity; resting-state fMRI; salience network; self-control; temptation

PMID:
29048582
PMCID:
PMC5716209
DOI:
10.1093/scan/nsx123
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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