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Yonsei Med J. 2017 Nov;58(6):1083-1091. doi: 10.3349/ymj.2017.58.6.1083.

Alterations in Gut Microbiota and Immunity by Dietary Fat.

Author information

1
Severance Biomedical Science Institute & Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
3
Severance Biomedical Science Institute & Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. mslee0923@yuhs.ac.

Abstract

Gut microbiota play critical physiological roles in energy extraction from the intestine and in the control of systemic immunity, as well as local intestinal immunity. Disturbance of gut microbiota leads to the development of several diseases, such as colitis, inflammatory bowel diseases, metabolic disorders, cancer, etc. From a metabolic point of view, the gut is a large metabolic organ and one of the first to come into contact with dietary fats. Interestingly, excessive dietary fat has been incriminated as a primary culprit of metabolic syndrome and obesity. After intake of high-fat diet or Western diet, extensive changes in gut microbiota have been observed, which may be an underlying cause of alterations in whole body metabolism and nutrient homeostasis. Here, we summarize recent data on changes in the gut microbiota and immunity associated with dietary fat, as well as their relationships with the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. These findings may provide insight into the understanding of the complex pathophysiology related to the development of metabolic diseases and offer an opportunity to develop novel candidates for therapeutic agents.

KEYWORDS:

Gut microbiota; diabetes; gut immunity; obesity

PMID:
29047231
PMCID:
PMC5653472
DOI:
10.3349/ymj.2017.58.6.1083
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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