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Rev Alerg Mex. 2017 Jul-Sep;64(3):277-290.

[Influence of lifestyle, diet and vitamin D on atopy in a population of Afro-descendant Colombian children].

[Article in Spanish; Abstract available in Spanish from the publisher]

Author information

1
Universidad de Cartagena, Facultad de Odontología, Grupo de Investigaciones GITOUC, Cartagena de Indias, Colombia. jmarrugoc@unicartagena.edu.co.

Abstract

in English, Spanish

BACKGROUND:

Allergic conditions have shown an increase in the past few decades. Hygiene, changes in lifestyle, diet and vitamin D have been blamed for this increase.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the role of environment, diet and vitamin D in atopic diseases in a population of Colombian Afro-descendant children.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional, descriptive, observational study in 200 Afro-descendant children of rural and urban areas from northern Colombia. Lifestyle and diet were established by questionnaires, atopy was assessed with skin tests and total and specific IgE and vitamin D levels were determined by ELISA.

RESULTS:

Results: Atopy was more prevalent in the urban population (24 % versus 7 %, p < 0.001). Blomia tropicalis was the most common allergen (80.6 %). The PCA indicated two dietary patterns. In the rural area children, the consumption of dairy products and fruit/vegetables was higher, and related with a protective effect on atopy (OR, 0.21 [p < 0.027] and OR, 0.11 [ p < 0.04]). A similar pattern was observed with total IgE and vitamin D levels (2450.73 versus 777.56 kU/mL [p < 0.01] and 59.32 ng/mL versus 31.14 ng/mL [p < 0.001], respectively).

CONCLUSION:

Allergic conditions were less prevalent in rural area residents, possibly owing to higher consumption of unpasteurized dairy products and fruit/vegetables, as well as higher levels of vitamin D.

KEYWORDS:

; Atopy; Diet; Life style; Vitamin D

PMID:
29046026
DOI:
10.29262/ram.v64i3.275
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