Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Can J Microbiol. 2018 Jan;64(1):28-40. doi: 10.1139/cjm-2017-0362. Epub 2017 Oct 18.

Effects of reclamation years on composition and diversity of soil bacterial communities in Northwest China.

Cheng Z1,1, Zhang F1,1, Gale WJ1,1, Wang W1,1, Sang W1,1, Yang H1,1.

Author information

1
Agricultural College, Shihezi University, Xinjiang Province 832003, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate bacterial community structure and diversity in soil aggregate fractions when salinized farmland was reclaimed after >27 years of abandonment and then farmed again for 1, 5, 10, and 15 years. Illumina MiSeq high-throughput sequencing was performed to characterize the soil bacterial communities in 5 aggregate size classes in each treatment. The results indicated that reclamation significantly increased macro-aggregation (>0.25 mm), as well as soil organic C, available N, and available P. The 10-year field had the largest proportion (93.9%) of soil in the macro-aggregate size classes (i.e., >0.25 mm) and the highest soil electrical conductivity. The 5 most dominant phyla in the soil samples were Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Acidobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. The phylogenetic diversity, Chao1, and Shannon indices increased after the abandoned land was reclaimed for farming, reaching maximums in the 15-year field. Among aggregate size classes, the 1-0.25 mm aggregates generally had the highest phylogenetic diversity, Chao1, and Shannon indices. Soil organic C and soil electrical conductivity were the main environmental factors affecting the soil bacterial communities. The composition and structure of the bacterial communities also varied significantly depending on soil aggregate size and time since reclamation.

KEYWORDS:

Illumina sequencing; abandoned farmland; agrégats de sol; bacterial community; communauté bactérienne; période remise en état; reclamation time; soil aggregates; séquençage par Illumina; terre agricole abandonnée

PMID:
29045798
DOI:
10.1139/cjm-2017-0362
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center