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J Public Health (Oxf). 2018 Sep 1;40(3):485-492. doi: 10.1093/pubmed/fdx134.

Joint effect of physical activity and sedentary behaviour on cardiovascular risk factors in Chilean adults.

Author information

1
Grupo IRyS, Escuela de Educación Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Valparaíso, Chile.
2
BHF Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
3
Escuela de Educación Física, Universidad San Sebastián, Concepción, Chile.
4
Grupo de Investigación Calidad de Vida y Estilos de vida saludables, Facultades de Educación y Humanidades, Universidad del Bío-Bío, Chillan, Chile.
5
Departamento de Educación Física, Facultad de Educación, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción, Chile.
6
Departamento de Ciencias de la Actividad Física, Núcleo de Investigación en Salud, Actividad Física y Deporte, Universidad de los Lagos, Osorno, Chile.
7
Departamento de Educación Física, Deportes y Recreación, Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco, Chile.
8
Instituto de Farmacia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile.
9
Instituto de Anatomía, Histología y Patología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile.
10
Escuela de Kinesiología, Facultad de Salud, Universidad Santo Tomás, Sede Valdivia, Chile.
11
Human Nutrition Research Centre, Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
12
Centro de Fisiología y Biomecánica, Universidad Mayor, Santiago, Chile.

Abstract

Background:

To investigate the associations between combined categories of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary behaviour (SB) with markers of adiposity and cardiovascular risk in adults.

Methods:

Overall, 5040 participants (mean age 46.4 years and 59.3% women) from the cross-sectional Chilean National Health Survey 2009-2010 were included in this study. MVPA and SB were measured using the Global Physical Activity questionnaire. Four categories were computed using MVPA- and SB-specific cut-offs ('High-SB & Active', 'Low-SB & Active', 'High-SB & Inactive' and 'Low-SB & Inactive').

Results:

Compared to the reference group ('High-SB & Inactive'), those in 'High-SB & Active' and 'Low-SB & Active' were less likely to have an obese BMI (OR: 0.67 [0.54; 0.85], P = 0.0001 and 0.74 [0.59; 0.92] P = 0.0007, respectively) and less likely to have metabolic syndrome (OR: 0.63 [0.49; 0.82], P < 0.0001 and 0.72 [0.57; 0.91], P = 0.007), central obesity (OR: 0.79 [0.65; 0.96], P = 0.016 and 0.71 [0.59; 0.84], P < 0.0001), diabetes (OR: 0.45 [0.35; 0.59], P < 0.0001 and 0.44 [0.34; 0.56], P < 0.0001) and hypertension (OR: 0.52 [0.43; 0.63], P < 0.0001 and 0.60 [0.50; 0.72], P < 0.0001), respectively.

Conclusions:

Being physically active and spending less time in SBs was associated with lower adiposity and improvements in cardiovascular risk factors.

PMID:
29045709
DOI:
10.1093/pubmed/fdx134
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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