Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Behav Brain Res. 2018 Dec 14;355:36-47. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2017.10.010. Epub 2017 Oct 16.

Selective inhibition of distracting input.

Author information

1
Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3UD, United Kingdom. Electronic address: maryann.noonan@psy.ox.ac.uk.
2
The Oxford Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, OX3 9DU, United Kingdom.
3
Centre for Human Brain Health, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, B15 2TT, United Kingdom.
4
Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3UD, United Kingdom; Oxford Centre for Human Brain Activity, Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, OX3 7JX, United Kingdom.

Abstract

We review a series of studies exploring distractor suppression. It is often assumed that preparatory distractor suppression is controlled via top-down mechanisms of attention akin to those that prepare brain areas for target enhancement. Here, we consider two alternative mechanisms: secondary inhibition and expectation suppression within a predictive coding framework. We draw on behavioural studies, evidence from neuroimaging and some animal studies. We conclude that there is very limited evidence for selective top-down control of preparatory inhibition. By contrast, we argue that distractor suppression often relies secondary inhibition of non-target items (relatively non-selective inhibition) and on statistical regularities of the environment, learned through direct experience.

KEYWORDS:

Alpha oscillations; Attention; Distractor inhibition; Frontoparietal network; Predictive coding

PMID:
29042157
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbr.2017.10.010

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center