Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuro Oncol. 2018 Mar 27;20(4):457-471. doi: 10.1093/neuonc/nox193.

Evidence and context of use for contrast enhancement as a surrogate of disease burden and treatment response in malignant glioma.

Ellingson BM1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8, Wen PY9, Cloughesy TF3,10.

Author information

1
UCLA Brain Tumor Imaging Laboratory, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
2
UCLA Center for Computer Vision and Imaging Biomarkers, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
3
UCLA Neuro-Oncology Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
4
UCLA Brain Research Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
5
Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
6
Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
7
Department of Physics in Medicine and Biology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
8
Department of Bioengineering, Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science at UCLA, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
9
Department of Neurooncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
10
Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.

Abstract

The use of contrast enhancement within the brain on CT or MRI has been the gold standard for diagnosis and therapeutic response assessment in malignant gliomas for decades. The use of contrast enhancing tumor size, however, remains controversial as a tool for accurately diagnosing and assessing treatment efficacy in malignant gliomas, particularly in the current, quickly evolving therapeutic landscape. The current article consolidates overwhelming evidence from hundreds of studies in the field of neuro-oncology, providing the necessary evidence base and specific contexts of use for consideration of contrast enhancing tumor size as an appropriate surrogate biomarker for disease burden and as a tool for measuring treatment response in malignant glioma, including glioblastoma.

PMID:
29040703
PMCID:
PMC5909663
DOI:
10.1093/neuonc/nox193
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center