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Int J Epidemiol. 2017 Dec 1;46(6):1985-1998. doi: 10.1093/ije/dyx102.

Robust inference in summary data Mendelian randomization via the zero modal pleiotropy assumption.

Author information

1
Postgraduate Program in Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil.
2
MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit.
3
School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

Abstract

Background:

Mendelian randomization (MR) is being increasingly used to strengthen causal inference in observational studies. Availability of summary data of genetic associations for a variety of phenotypes from large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) allows straightforward application of MR using summary data methods, typically in a two-sample design. In addition to the conventional inverse variance weighting (IVW) method, recently developed summary data MR methods, such as the MR-Egger and weighted median approaches, allow a relaxation of the instrumental variable assumptions.

Methods:

Here, a new method - the mode-based estimate (MBE) - is proposed to obtain a single causal effect estimate from multiple genetic instruments. The MBE is consistent when the largest number of similar (identical in infinite samples) individual-instrument causal effect estimates comes from valid instruments, even if the majority of instruments are invalid. We evaluate the performance of the method in simulations designed to mimic the two-sample summary data setting, and demonstrate its use by investigating the causal effect of plasma lipid fractions and urate levels on coronary heart disease risk.

Results:

The MBE presented less bias and lower type-I error rates than other methods under the null in many situations. Its power to detect a causal effect was smaller compared with the IVW and weighted median methods, but was larger than that of MR-Egger regression, with sample size requirements typically smaller than those available from GWAS consortia.

Conclusions:

The MBE relaxes the instrumental variable assumptions, and should be used in combination with other approaches in sensitivity analyses.

KEYWORDS:

Causality; Mendelian randomization; genetic pleiotropy; genetic variation; instrumental variables

PMID:
29040600
PMCID:
PMC5837715
DOI:
10.1093/ije/dyx102
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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