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Drugs. 2017 Nov;77(17):1819-1831. doi: 10.1007/s40265-017-0823-0.

Aspirin for Prevention of Preeclampsia.

Author information

1
Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Femme Mère Enfant Hospital, University Hospital Center, 59 boulevard Pinel, 69500, Bron, France.
2
Claude-Bernard University Lyon1, Lyon, France.
3
Assistance Publique-Hôpital de Paris, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Port-Royal Maternity, University Hospital Center Cochin Broca Hôtel Dieu, Groupe Hospitalier Universitaire Ouest, 53, Avenue de l'Observatoire, 75014, Paris, France.
4
PRES Sorbonne Paris Cité, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France.
5
PremUP Foundation, Paris, France.
6
DHU Risques et Grossesse, Paris, France.
7
Assistance Publique-Hôpital de Paris, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Port-Royal Maternity, University Hospital Center Cochin Broca Hôtel Dieu, Groupe Hospitalier Universitaire Ouest, 53, Avenue de l'Observatoire, 75014, Paris, France. vassilis.tsatsaris@aphp.fr.
8
PRES Sorbonne Paris Cité, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France. vassilis.tsatsaris@aphp.fr.
9
PremUP Foundation, Paris, France. vassilis.tsatsaris@aphp.fr.
10
DHU Risques et Grossesse, Paris, France. vassilis.tsatsaris@aphp.fr.

Abstract

Aspirin is currently the most widely prescribed treatment in the prevention of cardiovascular complications. The indications for the use of aspirin during pregnancy are, however, the subject of much controversy. Since the first evidence of the obstetric efficacy of aspirin in 1985, numerous studies have tried to determine the effect of low-dose aspirin on the incidence of preeclampsia, with very controversial results. Large meta-analyses including individual patient data have demonstrated that aspirin is effective in preventing preeclampsia in high-risk patients, mainly those with a history of preeclampsia. However, guidelines regarding the usage of aspirin to prevent preeclampsia differ considerably from one country to another. Screening modalities, target population, and aspirin dosage are still a matter of debate. In this review, we report the pharmacodynamics of aspirin, its main effects according to dosage and gestational age, and the evidence-based indications for primary and secondary prevention of preeclampsia.

PMID:
29039130
PMCID:
PMC5681618
DOI:
10.1007/s40265-017-0823-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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