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Environ Health Perspect. 2017 Oct 16;125(10):104501. doi: 10.1289/EHP2116.

Small-Scale Food Animal Production and Antimicrobial Resistance: Mountain, Molehill, or Something in-between?

Author information

1
Public Health Institute , Oakland, California, USA.
2
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan , Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
3
Instituto de Microbiologia, Colegio de Ciencias Biologicas y Ambientales, Universidad San Francisco de Quito , Quito, Ecuador.
4
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Michigan State University , East Lansing, Michigan, USA.
5
Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University , East Lansing, Michigan, USA.
6
Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota , St. Paul, Minnesota, USA.

Abstract

Small-scale food animal production is widely practiced around the globe, yet it is often overlooked in terms of the environmental health risks. Evidence suggests that small-scale food animal producers often employ the use of antimicrobials to improve the survival and growth of their animals, and that this practice leads to the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) that can potentially spread to humans. The nature of human-animal interactions in small-scale food animal production systems, generally practiced in and around the home, likely augments spillover events of AMR into the community on a scale that is currently unrecognized and deserves greater attention. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP2116.

PMID:
29038091
PMCID:
PMC5933306
DOI:
10.1289/EHP2116
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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