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Anxiety Stress Coping. 2018 Mar;31(2):135-145. doi: 10.1080/10615806.2017.1390083. Epub 2017 Oct 16.

Physical fitness and prior physical activity are both associated with less cortisol secretion during psychosocial stress.

Author information

1
a Department of Life Sciences , University of Westminster , London , UK.
2
b Department of Psychology , University of Westminster , London , UK.
3
c Department of Biomedical Sciences , University of Westminster , London , UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Evidence linking fitness and decreased psychosocial stress comes from studies of athletes and typically relies upon self-report measures. Furthermore, there is little evidence regarding the impact of physical activity (PA) prior to a stressor. The aims of this study were to determine whether fitness and prior PA influence cortisol concentrations during psychosocial stress.

METHODS:

Seventy-five non-athletic participants took part in a submaximal walk prior to the Trier Social Stress Test for Groups (TSST-G). During the walk, fitness was assessed using heart rate (HR). A further 89 participants took part in the TSST-G without the walk. Stress responsiveness was assessed using salivary cortisol collected at 10-min intervals on seven occasions.

RESULTS:

Hierarchical multiple regression revealed that average walking HR accounted for 9% of the variance in cortisol secretion (Pā€‰=ā€‰.016), where a higher HR was associated with higher cortisol secretion. Between-subjects ANCOVA revealed that the walking group had a significantly lower cortisol secretion than the non-walking group (Pā€‰=ā€‰.009).

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings indicate that fitter individuals have reduced cortisol secretion during psychosocial stress. They also indicate that prior PA can reduce cortisol concentrations during psychosocial stress and are suggestive of a role of PA in reducing the impact of stress on health.

KEYWORDS:

Fitness; cortisol; health; physical activity; psychosocial stress

PMID:
29037088
DOI:
10.1080/10615806.2017.1390083
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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