Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2018 Jan;74:68-71. doi: 10.1016/j.archger.2017.10.007. Epub 2017 Oct 12.

Memory Age Identity as a predictor of cognitive function in the elderly: A 2-year follow-up study.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Ajou Good Hospital, Suwon, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea; Institute on Aging, Ajou University Medical Center, Suwon, Republic of Korea; Memory impairment center, Ajou University Hospital, Suwon, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea; Institute on Aging, Ajou University Medical Center, Suwon, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Ajou Danam Hospital, Suwon, Republic of Korea.
6
Department of Psychiatry, National Medical Center of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: sjsonpsy@ajou.ac.kr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is a growing interest in finding psychosocial predictors related to cognitive function. In our previous research, we conducted a cross-sectional study on memory age identity (MAI) and found that MAI might be associated with objective cognitive performance in non-cognitively impaired elderly. A longitudinal study was conducted to better understand the importance of MAI as a psychosocial predictor related to objective cognitive function.

METHODS:

Data obtained from 1345 Korean subjects aged 60 years and above were analyzed. During the two-year follow-up, subjective memory age was assessed on three occasions using the following question: How old do you feel based on your memory? Discrepancy between subjective memory age and chronological age was then calculated. We defined this value as 'memory age identity (MAI)'. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) was then obtained to demonstrate the relationship between MAI and Korean version-Mini Mental State Examination (K-MMSE) score over the 2 years of study.

RESULTS:

MAI was found to significantly (β=-0.03, p< 0.0001) predict objective cognitive performance in the non-cognitively impaired elderly.

CONCLUSION:

MAI may be a potential psychosocial predictor related to objective cognitive performance in the non-cognitively impaired elderly.

KEYWORDS:

Cognition; Elderly; Memory age identity

PMID:
29035740
DOI:
10.1016/j.archger.2017.10.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center