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J Health Organ Manag. 2017 Sep 18;31(6):665-678. doi: 10.1108/JHOM-05-2017-0113.

Voice of the Clinician: the case of an Australian health system.

Author information

1
Committix Pty Ltd, Newcastle, Australia.
2
School of Business, Clarkson University , Schenectady, New York, USA.
3
Mid North Coast Local Health District, Coffs Harbour, Australia.
4
Clinical Governance Unit, Mid North Coast Local Health District, Coffs Harbour, Australia.
5
UQ Business School, The University of Queensland , Brisbane, Australia.

Abstract

Purpose The Voice of the Clinician project commenced during an era when practitioner burnout, dissatisfaction, and turnover became an increasingly global health workforce concern. One key problem is clinical staff not being empowered to voice their concerns to decision-makers, as was found in this case study of an Australian public health organization. The following research question informed the present study: What is a better committee system for clinician engagement in decision-making processes? The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach The Mid North Coast Local Health District in New South Wales aspired to improve engagement between frontline clinicians and decision-makers. Social network analysis methods and mathematical modeling were used in the discovery of how committees are connected to each other and subsequently to other committee members. Findings This effort uncovered a hidden organizational architecture of 323 committees of 926 members which overall cost 84,729 person hours and AUD$2.923 million per annum. Furthermore, frontline clinicians were located far from centers of influence, just 37 percent of committees had terms of reference, and clinicians reported that meeting agendas were not being met. Practical implications In response to the findings, a technological platform was created so that the board of directors could visually see all the committees and the connections between them, thus creating ways to further improve communication, transparency of process, and - ultimately - clinician engagement. Originality/value The breakthrough idea is that all organizational meetings can be seen as a system of engagement and should be analyzed to determine and describe the points and pathways where clinician voice is blocked.

KEYWORDS:

Australia; Communication; Decision making; Governance; Networks

PMID:
29034826
PMCID:
PMC5868555
DOI:
10.1108/JHOM-05-2017-0113
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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