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Am J Prev Med. 2017 Dec;53(6):764-771. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2017.07.009. Epub 2017 Oct 9.

Sedentary Time, Physical Activity, and Adiposity: Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Associations in CARDIA.

Author information

1
Department of Health and Physical Activity, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: bbarone@pitt.edu.
2
Departments of Epidemiology, Human Genetics, and Environmental Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health-Austin Campus, Austin, Texas.
3
Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.
4
Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences, and Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
5
Department of Health and Physical Activity, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
6
Divisions of Cardiology and Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, California; Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
7
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland.
8
Divisions of Cardiology and Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, California.
9
Division of Preventive Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Higher sedentary time (ST) and lower moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) have each been associated with greater adiposity, but most studies are cross-sectional and measure ST and MVPA by self-report. This study evaluated associations between objective ST and MVPA with current and 5-year changes in BMI and waist circumference.

METHODS:

The Coronary Artery and Risk Development in Young Adults longitudinal cohort study recruited black or white young adults from four U.S. cities. This analysis (conducted in 2016) used data from 2005 to 2006 as baseline and 2010 to 2011 as 5-year follow-up. Accelerometers measured baseline ST (total and prolonged in bouts of ≥10 minutes) and MVPA (bouts of ≥10 minutes). BMI and waist circumference were assessed at baseline and repeated 5 years later. Regression models included sedentary time and MVPA simultaneously with adjustment for demographics and lifestyle factors.

RESULTS:

Participants (n=1,826) were 57% female; 40% black; aged 38-50 years; and had a BMI of 28.7 (SD=6.3). At baseline, total and prolonged ST were directly associated with BMI and waist circumference, whereas MVPA was inversely related (all p<0.05). Longitudinally, only prolonged ST (per hour/day) was associated with greater increases in BMI (0.077, p=0.033) and waist circumference (0.198 cm, p=0.028). Associations between ST and adiposity were more apparent in less active participants. Risk of ≥5% increase in BMI across assessments increased by 8%-10% (p<0.05) per hour/day of ST.

CONCLUSIONS:

Time spent sedentary was associated with increases in adiposity over time. Reducing sedentary time may be a novel strategy for weight control.

PMID:
29032856
PMCID:
PMC5696042
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2017.07.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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