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Brain Behav Immun. 2018 Feb;68:123-131. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2017.10.007. Epub 2017 Oct 12.

Maternal depressive symptoms linked to reduced fecal Immunoglobulin A concentrations in infants.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, 3-527 Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, 11405-87 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1C9, Canada.
2
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, 4-126A Li Ka Shing Center for Health Research Innovation, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1, Canada.
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, CDC, Owerko Centre, Room 355, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, CDC, Owerko Centre, Room 355, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Canada.
4
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, 4-577 Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, 11405-87 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1C9, Canada.
5
Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba, 513 - 715 McDermot Avenue Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 3P4, Canada.
6
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, 1048B Research Transition Facility, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V2, Canada.
7
Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, BC Children's Hospital, Room A2-147, 950 W 28th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4H4, Canada.
8
Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto, The Hospital for Sick Children, Peter Gilgan Center for Research and Learning, 686 Bay Street, 10-9716, Toronto, Ontario M5G 0A4, Canada.
9
Department of Medicine, McMaster University, 50 Charlton Avenue E., Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6, Canada.
10
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 223 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1R4, Canada.
11
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, 3-527 Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, 11405-87 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1C9, Canada; School of Public Health, University of Alberta, 3-527 Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, 11405-87 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1C9, Canada. Electronic address: kozyrsky@ualberta.ca.

Abstract

Secretory Immunoglobulin A (sIgA) plays a critical role to infant gut mucosal immunity. Delayed IgA production is associated with greater risk of allergic disease. Murine models of stressful events during pregnancy and infancy show alterations in gut immunity and microbial composition in offspring, but little is known about the stress-microbiome-immunity pathways in humans. We investigated differences in infant fecal sIgA concentrations according to the presence of maternal depressive symptoms during and after pregnancy. A subsample of 403 term infants from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) cohort were studied. Their mothers completed the Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale when enrolled prenatally and again postpartum. Quantified by Immundiagnostik sIgA ELISA kit, sIgA from infant stool was compared across maternal depressive symptom categories using Mann-Whitney U-tests and logistic regression models that controlled for various covariates. Twelve percent of women reported clinically significant depressive symptoms only prenatally, 8.7% had only postpartum symptoms and 9.2% had symptoms both pre and postnatally. Infants born to mothers with pre and postnatal symptoms had significantly lower median sIgA concentrations than those in the reference group (4.4 mg/g feces vs. 6.3 mg/g feces; p = 0.033). The odds for sIgA concentrations in the lowest quartile was threefold higher (95% CI: 1.25-7.55) when mothers had pre and postnatal symptoms, after controlling for breastfeeding status, infant age, antibiotics exposure and other covariates. Postnatal symptoms were not associated with fecal sIgA, independently of breastfeeding status. Infants born to mothers with depressive symptoms appear to have lower fecal sIgA concentrations, predisposing them to higher risk for allergic disease.

KEYWORDS:

Allergy; Asthma; Birth cohort; Gut immunity; Gut microbiome; Infants; Maternal distress; Postnatal; Prenatal; Secretory Immunoglobulin A

PMID:
29032226
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbi.2017.10.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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