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Am J Ophthalmol. 2017 Dec;184:129-136. doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2017.10.001. Epub 2017 Oct 13.

Pregnancy-induced Changes in Corneal Biomechanics and Topography Are Thyroid Hormone Related.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland.
2
Obstetrics Service, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland; Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
3
Department of Ophthalmology, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland; Center for Applied Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine (CABMM), University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
4
Research Center for Statistics, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
5
Obstetrics Service, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland.
6
Center for Applied Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine (CABMM), University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; ELZA Institute, Dietikon, Switzerland; Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; Department of Ophthalmology, USC Roski Eye Institute, USC Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: farhad@hafezi.ch.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To identify biomechanical and topographic changes of the cornea during pregnancy and the postpartum period and its association to hormonal changes.

DESIGN:

Prospective single-center observational cohort study.

METHODS:

Participants were 24 pregnant women (48 eyes), monitored throughout pregnancy and after delivery. Biomechanical and topographic corneal properties were measured using the Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA) and a Scheimpflug imaging system (Pentacam HR) each trimester and 1 month after delivery. At the same consultations blood plasma levels of estradiol (E2) and thyroid hormones (TSH, T3t, T4t) were also determined. A factorial MANCOVA was used to detect interactions between hormonal plasma levels and ocular parameters.

RESULTS:

Significant differences in corneal biomechanical and topographic parameters were found during pregnancy in relation to T3t (p = .01), T4t (p < .001), T3t/T4t (P = .001), and TSH (p = .001) plasma levels. E2 plasma levels (p = .092) and time period of measurement (p = .975) did not significantly affect corneal parameters. TSH levels significantly affected the maximal keratometry reading (p = .036), the vertical keratometry reading (p = .04), and the index of height asymmetry (p = .014). Those results persist after excluding hypothyroidism patients from the statistical analysis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Hormonal changes affecting corneal biomechanics and topography during pregnancy could be thyroid related. Dysthyroidism may directly influence corneal biomechanics and represents a clinically relevant factor that needs further investigation.

PMID:
29032108
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajo.2017.10.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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