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J Anxiety Disord. 2017 Dec;52:34-42. doi: 10.1016/j.janxdis.2017.09.007. Epub 2017 Oct 9.

Examining temporal alterations in Social Anxiety Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: The relation between autobiographical memory, future goals, and current self-views.

Author information

1
Behavior, Health & Psychopathology, KU Leuven, Tiensestraat 102, 3000 Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: julie.krans@kuleuven.be.
2
Centre for Anxiety Disorders Overwaal, Institution for Integrated Mental Health Care Pro Persona, Tarweweg 2, Postbus 31253, 6503 CG, Nijmegen, The Netherlands,. Electronic address: m.peeters01@propersona.nl.
3
Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: g.naring@bsi.ru.nl.
4
Department of Psychology, Sarah Lawrence College, 1 Mead Way, Bronxville, NY 10708, United States; Department of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, 1 Park Avenue New York, NY 10016, United States. Electronic address: abrown@sarahlawrence.edu.
5
Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: junedebree@gmail.com.
6
Centre for Anxiety Disorders Overwaal, Institution for Integrated Mental Health Care Pro Persona, Tarweweg 2, Postbus 31253, 6503 CG, Nijmegen, The Netherlands,; Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: a.van.minnen@propersona.nl.

Abstract

The self is a multi-faceted and temporally dynamic construct reflecting representations and beliefs about identity in the past, present, and future. Clinical studies have shown that individuals with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) exhibit alterations in self-related processing but these studies have focused primarily on memory. Few studies in PTSD and SAD have examined self-related processing for the present and future, and no studies have directly compared these processes across these two disorders. Individuals diagnosed with PTSD (n=21), SAD (n=21), and healthy controls (n=21) completed cognitive tasks related to the past, present, and future. Disorder congruent temporal alterations were found across both disorders. Further, regression analyses revealed that trauma-related memories were significantly predicted by future goals related to the trauma, whereas social anxiety-related recall was predicted by current socially anxious self-views. Thus, although self-related processing may be common in PTSD and SAD, those aspects of the self most strongly associated with disorder-congruent recall differ by disorder. Self-alterations may be modifiable and developing a better understanding of past, present, and future self-processing might aid in the development of interventions that target these process.

KEYWORDS:

Autobiographical memory; Future thinking; PTSD; Self-views; Social anxiety disorder

PMID:
29031160
DOI:
10.1016/j.janxdis.2017.09.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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