Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2017 Oct 13;7(1):13163. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-12735-3.

Aggregation behavior and reproductive compatibility in the family Cimicidae.

Author information

1
Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. zcdevrie@ncsu.edu.
2
W.M. Keck Center for Behavioral Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. zcdevrie@ncsu.edu.
3
Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA.
4
Department of Ecology, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences, Prague, Kamýcká, Czech Republic.
5
W.M. Keck Center for Behavioral Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA.
6
Center for Human Health and the Environment, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA.

Abstract

Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius) provide a unique opportunity to understand speciation and host-associated divergence in parasites. Recently, two sympatric but genetically distinct lineages of C. lectularius were identified: one associated with humans and one associated with bats. We investigated two mechanisms that could maintain genetic differentiation in the field: reproductive compatibility (via mating crosses) and aggregation fidelity (via two-choice sheltering assays). Effects were assessed at the intra-lineage level (within human-associated bed bugs), inter-lineage level (between human- and bat-associated bed bugs), and inter-species level (between C. lectularius and Cimex pipistrelli [bat bug]). Contrary to previous reports, bed bugs were found to be reproductively compatible at both the intra- and inter-lineage levels, but not at the inter-species level (although three hybrids were produced, one of which developed into an adult). Lineage- and species-specific aggregation fidelity was only detected in 8% (4 out of 48) of the aggregation fidelity assays run. These results indicate that under laboratory conditions, host-associated lineages of bed bugs are reproductively compatible, and aggregation pheromones are not capable of preventing gene flow between lineages.

PMID:
29030574
PMCID:
PMC5640654
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-12735-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center