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Clin Psychol Rev. 2017 Dec;58:1-15. doi: 10.1016/j.cpr.2017.09.001. Epub 2017 Sep 6.

A review of current evidence regarding the ICD-11 proposals for diagnosing PTSD and complex PTSD.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, London, UK. Electronic address: c.brewin@ucl.ac.uk.
2
Division of Dissemination and Training, National Center for PTSD, Menlo Park, CA, USA.
3
School of Business, National College of Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.
4
School of Psychology, University of Ulster, Coleraine, North Ireland.
5
Department of Psychology, Division of Psychopathology, University of Zurich, Switzerland.
6
School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
7
Meditrina Healthcare, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
8
FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.
9
Department of Psychology, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa.
10
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Canada.
11
University of Jaffna, Sri Lanka.
12
National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health, Tokyo, Japan.
13
Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, UK.
14
Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
15
Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland; Global Mental Health Program, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

The World Health Organization's proposals for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases, scheduled for release in 2018, involve a very brief set of symptoms and a distinction between two sibling disorders, PTSD and Complex PTSD. This review of studies conducted to test the validity and implications of the diagnostic proposals generally supports the proposed 3-factor structure of PTSD symptoms, the 6-factor structure of Complex PTSD symptoms, and the distinction between PTSD and Complex PTSD. Estimates derived from DSM-based items suggest the likely prevalence of ICD-11 PTSD in adults is lower than ICD-10 PTSD and lower than DSM-IV or DSM-5 PTSD, but this may change with the development of items that directly measure the ICD-11 re-experiencing requirement. Preliminary evidence suggests the prevalence of ICD-11 PTSD in community samples of children and adolescents is similar to DSM-IV and DSM-5. ICD-11 PTSD detects some individuals with significant impairment who would not receive a diagnosis under DSM-IV or DSM-5. ICD-11 CPTSD identifies a distinct group who have more often experienced multiple and sustained traumas and have greater functional impairment than those with PTSD.

PMID:
29029837
DOI:
10.1016/j.cpr.2017.09.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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