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Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2017 Nov 7;12(11):1753-1761. doi: 10.2215/CJN.01450217. Epub 2017 Oct 12.

Disparity between Nephrologists' Opinions and Contemporary Practices for Community Follow-Up after AKI Hospitalization.

Author information

1
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine.
2
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
3
Department of Community Health Sciences.
4
O'Brien Institute for Public Health, and.
5
Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; and.
6
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, mjames@ucalgary.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Recent guidelines suggest that patients should be evaluated after AKI for resolution versus progression of CKD. There is uncertainty as to the role of nephrologists in this process. The objective of this study was to compare the follow-up recommendations from nephrologists with contemporary processes of care for varying scenarios of patients hospitalized with AKI.

DESIGN, SETTING PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS:

We surveyed Canadian nephrologists using a series of clinical vignettes of patients hospitalized with severe AKI and asked them to rank their likelihood of recommending follow-up for each patient after hospital discharge. We compared these responses with administrative health data on rates of community follow-up with nephrologists for patients hospitalized with AKI in Alberta, Canada between 2005 and 2014.

RESULTS:

One hundred forty-five nephrologists participated in the survey (46% of the physician membership of the Canadian Society of Nephrology). Nephrologists surveyed indicated that they would definitely or probably re-evaluate patients in 87% of the scenarios provided, with a higher likelihood of follow-up for patients with a history of preexisting CKD (89%), heart failure (92%), receipt of acute dialysis (91%), and less complete recovery of kidney function (98%). In contrast, only 24% of patients with similar characteristics were seen by a nephrologist in Alberta within 1 year after a hospitalization with AKI, with a trend toward lower rates of follow-up over more recent years of the study. Follow-up with a nephrologist was significantly less common among patients over the age of 80 years old (20%) and more common among patients with preexisting CKD (43%) or a nephrology consultation before or during AKI hospitalization (78% and 41%, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

There is a substantial disparity between the opinions of nephrologists and actual processes of care for nephrology evaluation of patients after hospitalization with severe AKI.

KEYWORDS:

Acute Kidney Injury; Alberta; Follow-Up Studies; Nephrologists; Patient Discharge; Referral and Consultation; Renal Insufficiency, Chronic; Surveys and Questionnaires; Uncertainty; acute renal failure; clinical nephrology; dialysis; heart failure; hospitalization; nephrology

PMID:
29025786
PMCID:
PMC5672966
DOI:
10.2215/CJN.01450217
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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