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Obes Rev. 2017 Oct 10. doi: 10.1111/obr.12629. [Epub ahead of print]

Obesity as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease: weighing the evidence.

Author information

1
Novo Nordisk Inc., NJ, USA.
2
MCPHS University, Boston, MA, USA.
3
VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Mantzoros Lab, Division of Endocrinology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Division of Endocrinology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the sixth leading cause of death in the USA today; therefore, it is imperative that public health initiatives and clinical strategies are developed to prevent and effectively treat AD. Despite the enormous impact that AD has on individuals, families, society, and the health care system, there are no biomarkers to clearly identify those at risk for AD, public health prevention strategies in place, or treatments to address the underlying pathology or stop the progression of AD. There is ample scientific as well as empirical evidence that obesity and its metabolic and vascular comorbidities are related to AD and likely in the causative pathway. Obesity prevention and treatment could prove to be an efficacious and safe approach to preventing AD, a serious and daunting epidemic disease. In this review, we present the current pathophysiological and clinical evidence linking obesity and obesity-related comorbidities (eg, insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia, and type 2 diabetes) with AD. Additionally, we discuss which population to target and when to consider treatment for AD. Finally, we summarize the current evidence regarding the efficacy of anti-obesity and anti-diabetic pharmacotherapeutic agents for the treatment of AD.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; metabolic; obesity; pathology

PMID:
29024348
DOI:
10.1111/obr.12629
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