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J Fish Biol. 2017 Dec;91(6):1737-1744. doi: 10.1111/jfb.13477. Epub 2017 Oct 12.

Cannibalism in non-native brown trout Salmo trutta and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss stream-dwelling populations.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, Chemistry, Pharmacy, Institute of Biology, Freie Universität Berlin, Königin-Luise-Strasse 1-3, 14195 Berlin, Germany.
2
Berlin-Brandenburg Institute of Advanced Biodiversity Research (BBIB), Altensteinstrasse 34, 14195 Berlin, Germany.
3
Department of Ecosystem Research, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB), Müggelseedamm 310, 12587 Berlin, Germany.
4
Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, 110 Shaffer Road, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, U.S.A.
5
Fisheries Ecology Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, 110 Shaffer Road, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, U.S.A.
6
Tolmin Angling Association, Modrej 26a, 65216 Most na Soci, Slovenia.
7
Station Biologique de la Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, 13200 Arles, France.

Abstract

Introduced and allopatric populations of brown trout Salmo trutta and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were sampled in Slovenia for stable isotope analysis to assess dietary niche shifts through ontogeny and estimate the propensity for cannibalism. Both S. trutta and O. mykiss are cannibals, with higher average relative contribution of conspecific assimilated energy for S. trutta (27·9%) compared with O. mykiss (7·7%). The smallest cannibal was 166 mm in the S. trutta population and 247 mm in the O. mykiss population.

KEYWORDS:

biological invasion; niche; ontogeny; piscivory; stable-isotope analysis

PMID:
29023766
DOI:
10.1111/jfb.13477
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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