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Sci Rep. 2017 Oct 11;7(1):12969. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-13537-3.

Functional maturation in preterm infants measured by serial recording of cortical activity.

Author information

1
Department of Neurological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. nathan.stevenson@helsinki.fi.
2
Department of Children's Clinical Neurophysiology, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. nathan.stevenson@helsinki.fi.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
4
Department of Neurological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
5
Department of Children's Clinical Neurophysiology, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
6
Irish Centre for Fetal and Neonatal Translational Research, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.

Abstract

Minimally invasive, automated cot-side tools for monitoring early neurological development can be used to guide individual treatment and benchmark novel interventional studies. We develop an automated estimate of the EEG maturational age (EMA) for application to serial recordings in preterm infants. The EMA estimate was based on a combination of 23 computational features estimated from both the full EEG recording and a period of low EEG activity (46 features in total). The combination function (support vector regression) was trained using 101 serial EEG recordings from 39 preterm infants with a gestational age less than 28 weeks and normal neurodevelopmental outcome at 12 months of age. EEG recordings were performed from 24 to 38 weeks post-menstrual age (PMA). The correlation between the EMA and the clinically determined PMA at the time of EEG recording was 0.936 (95%CI: 0.932-0.976; n = 39). All infants had an increase in EMA between the first and last EEG recording and 57/62 (92%) of repeated measures within an infant had an increasing EMA with PMA of EEG recording. The EMA is a surrogate measure of age that can accurately determine brain maturation in preterm infants.

PMID:
29021546
PMCID:
PMC5636845
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-13537-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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